Genre: Historical FIction


Aug 10
Review: Tangled Webs by Lee Bross

Review: Tangled Webs by Lee Bross

One of the things that caught my eye in the synopsis for “Tangled Webs” is the description of the protagonist as “the most notorious blackmailer” in eighteenth-century London.  But after reading “Tangled Webs,” I have to say, “er, not so much.”  Arista is a sympathetic and fairly complex character, but a notorious blackmailer?  I think it would be more honest to call her a glamorous messenger. It’s impossible not to feel compassion for Arista who, along with other children, is… Read more »


Apr 20
Review: Prisoner of Night and Fog by Anne Blankman

Review: Prisoner of Night and Fog by Anne Blankman

If you’ve been craving a novel that depicts Adolf Hitler in all of his teenager-creeping glory, Prisoner of Night and Fog might be for you.  I can usually count on having good luck with historical fiction, particularly novels set during WWI or WWII.  (This story takes place in the period between the two wars.)  But unfortunately, this book was mostly a miss for me, primarily due to problems with the protagonist. Gretchen is a teenager in Munich, fiercely loyal to… Read more »


Apr 03
Review: A Mad, Wicked Folly by Sharon Biggs Waller

Review: A Mad, Wicked Folly by Sharon Biggs Waller

I want to hug this book.  If you like historical fiction, you need to read A Mad, Wicked Folly.  Hell, even if you don’t, I’m going to order you to read it anyway.  I’ll even say that it would be a mad, wicked folly for you to skip this book.  Heh heh.  I’m sorry.  That was terrible.  I’ll try to make it up to you by sharing all of the reasons I loved this book. A Mad, Wicked Folly is… Read more »


Mar 16
Review and Giveaway: A Death-Struck Year by Makiia Lucier

Review and Giveaway: A Death-Struck Year by Makiia Lucier

Cleo Barry is a normal high-school girl, with normal high-school girl-type concerns in Portland, Oregon in 1918.  All of her friends have their post-high school lives figured out: marriage for some, or college, or traveling.  But Cleo has “no plan.  No dream.  No calling.”  Her parents died when she was young, and her older brother, Jack, and his wife, Lucy, have guardianship of Cleo.  Jack and Lucy are headed to San Francisco for six weeks to celebrate their anniversary while… Read more »


Jan 16
Review: Palace of Spies by Sarah Zettel

Review: Palace of Spies by Sarah Zettel

The hot pink cover of Palace of Spies doesn’t really scream “18th century,” but underneath all that fuchsia is a fun tale of historical fiction.  Peggy Fitzroy is an orphan in England, living under the guardianship of her wealthy uncle.  While she has all the necessities provided for her, along with a close relationship with her cousin, Olivia, Peggy’s uncle makes it very clear that his support is solely  a result of his sense of familial duty.  To get Peggy… Read more »


Oct 03
Review: Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb

Review: Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb

My knowledge of the Tudor period primarily comes from the Showtime series, The Tudors, the wonderful film, Elizabeth, starring Cate Blanchett, and the occasional historical fiction novel.  In other words, my knowledge is not exactly extensive, and I approached Witchstruck with the desire to be entertained and without any thought of wanting to nitpick for accuracy.  Obviously, since Lamb decided to feature a witch living alongside the future Queen Elizabeth, we know that this is not intended to be a… Read more »


Sep 13
Review and Giveaway: Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

Review and Giveaway: Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein

I haven’t yet read Code Name Verity, Elizabeth Wein’s companion novel to Rose Under Fire, but now I absolutely must.  If you haven’t read CNV, then I’m sure you’ve at least heard the raves, and based on Wein’s writing in Rose Under Fire, the raves are warranted. I feel like I have a decent knowledge of WWII, but I wasn’t aware that American women piloted planes for the Allies during the war.  Rose Justice, the fictional narrator of the story,… Read more »


Sep 03
Review: The Deepest Night by Shana Abe

Review: The Deepest Night by Shana Abe

Note: This review contains spoilers of the first book in the series, The Sweetest Dark. The Deepest Night suffers from a case of sophomore-itis.  The first book, The Sweetest Dark (you can see my review here), revealed Lora’s shocking secret: she’s a dragon.  And so is Armand, who is deeply in love with Lora.  Small world!  That book was enjoyable for a lot of reasons: The WWI setting in England; the fish out of water aspect of poor-girl Lora given… Read more »