Source: Publisher


Jan 14
Review: The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

Review: The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

It is my dream that within my lifetime, we will make contact with intelligent alien life.  (Or more likely, they will make contact with us.)  Sure, I’d like for them to treat us nicely and go easy on the anal probes, but all things considered, death by alien invasion wouldn’t be a bad way to go.  I’m happy to read any author’s take on what human interaction with aliens might look like, and Michel Faber presents a story that is incredibly… Read more »


Jan 07
Review: When by Victoria Laurie

Review: When by Victoria Laurie

Imagine if, in real life, someone had the ability to look at any person (or even a photograph of that person) and instantly know the precise date when that person will die.  If that person’s amazing ability was made public, I imagine she would be snatched up by the CIA or NSA and forced to assist in all sorts of covert missions.  Now, THAT is a story I’d want to read.  Sadly, When was not that story.  It was actually… Read more »


Aug 06
Review: The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

Review: The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

Before I even start to discuss the plot of The Good Girl, I have to mention the formatting of the e-ARC I read, which is the worst I’ve ever seen.  (That is, I hope it’s ONLY the formatting of the e-ARC.  If the finished copy – or even the physical ARC – is formatted like this, it’s inexplicable.)  There are three POV’s in The Good Girl – all first person (the kidnapper, the mother of the kidnap victim, and the detective), and… Read more »


Jul 30
Review: The Last Policeman by Ben Winters

Review: The Last Policeman by Ben Winters

It’s impossible to read The Last Policeman and not think about what you would do in the event of an impending, doomsday-level asteroid strike on earth.  I have to admit that I find the idea exciting, in the same way that I find the ideas of a zombie apocalypse or an alien invasion exciting.  (Yeah, I’m weird like that.)  While I’ve read and watched my share of post-apocalyptic books and films, pre-apocalyptic stories seem to be a bit harder to… Read more »


Jul 08
Review: Bittersweet by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore

Review: Bittersweet by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore

After finishing Bittersweet, I’m wondering if I was supposed to love the MC, Mabel, or to hate her.  I suspect we’re supposed to regard her as plucky and resourceful, but she’s really quite awful.  When we meet her, she’s in the midst of what looks like a Single White Female type of obsession with (or possibly a crush on) her beautiful roommate, Ev Winslow.  I thought that this had the potential to be fun, but that angle is quickly discarded for a ho-hum… Read more »


Jul 06
Review: Adam by Ariel Schrag

Review: Adam by Ariel Schrag

Reviewing Adam is quite the conundrum for me.  After I finished this book, and while I was in the process of writing this review, I read some reviews on Goodreads.  I don’t typically do that, but there were some themes in this book that were highly…questionable.  (I’ll get into them below.)  Despite that, I liked Adam very much – the book, and not so much the character.  I know very, very little about the transgender community, and I do not… Read more »


Jul 01
Review: Conversion by Katherine Howe

Review: Conversion by Katherine Howe

Conversion combines a modern story of bizarre occurrences at an exclusive prep school alongside a recounting of the Salem Witch Trials.  Colleen Rowley is the narrator of the modern story set mostly in her school in Danvers, Massachusetts.  She’s in her senior year at school, she’s fighting to become valedictorian, and she has her sights set on Harvard.  This is enough pressure for any teenager, but life gets even more stressful when Colleen’s classmates fall victim to a strange ailment… Read more »


Jun 26
Review: I Am the Mission by Allen Zadoff

Review: I Am the Mission by Allen Zadoff

I really enjoyed the first book in this series, I Am the Weapon, although I read it under its previous title, Boy Nobody.  In this sequel, the assassin, nicknamed Boy Nobody, is sent on a new mission.  My main problem with the story is that this felt so similar to the previous book – he is to assassinate a powerful man, but allows himself to get too close to the target’s child(ren), a major violation of his training.  It also… Read more »