Source: Publisher


Jun 24
Review: Complicit by Stephanie Kuehn

Review: Complicit by Stephanie Kuehn

Complicit is Stephanie Kuehn’s excellent follow-up to her excellent debut, Charm & Strange.  Both novels feature some similar characteristics: a male POV exhibiting some psychological issues, past physical and/or emotional trauma, a big twist, a gut-punch of an ending, and Kuehn’s beautiful writing style.  This time, though, I was not surprised by the twist.  I thought it was telegraphed quite clearly at several points, and because I’d read Charm & Strange, I was already on the lookout.  But figuring out… Read more »


Jun 18
Review: The Here and Now by Ann Brashares

Review: The Here and Now by Ann Brashares

The best part about The Here and Now is this quote by Stephen Hawking at the beginning of the book, “If time travel were possible, we’d be inundated by tourists from the future.” I had never heard that quote before, but after reading it, I thought, “Of course!” It’s heard to argue with this logic. But it’s also a bit depressing to think that time travel will never be possible. So, we will have to be content with books and… Read more »


Jun 17
Review: The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

Review: The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

The Girl with All the Gifts might be my favorite book of 2014 (so far).  It’s certainly in my top 5.  Before I discuss the book, I have to discuss the synopsis.  I feel like I’ve been complaining about synopses a lot recently, usually because they don’t reflect the tone of the book.  This is probably the most egregious example.  The synopsis is written as though a very young child with a very limited vocabulary is speaking.  You would rightfully… Read more »


Jun 03
Review: Dear Killer by Katherine Ewell

Review: Dear Killer by Katherine Ewell

This might be one of the hardest books I’ve ever had to rate, because on one hand, the plot is completely, thoroughly, and endlessly ludicrous, and it features one of the most distasteful (and not in a fun way) narrators I’ve ever come across.  On the other hand, once I picked it up, I also could not stop myself from turning the pages.  DNF’ing was never an option.  There might have been a bit of a “can’t turn away from this… Read more »


May 18
Review: A Girl Called Fearless by Catherine Linka

Review: A Girl Called Fearless by Catherine Linka

A Girl Called Fearless is one of the more disturbing dystopian novels that I’ve read.  As with any dystopia, while reading it, I ask myself, “Could this actually happen?”  I had a hard time accepting the reality of the society in this story, and while it disturbed me, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I might have otherwise. Ten years ago, a synthetic hormone in the U.S. food supply wiped out the vast majority of women of child-bearing age…. Read more »


May 13
Review and Giveaway: Saving Lucas Biggs by Maria de los Santos and Davis Teague

Review and Giveaway: Saving Lucas Biggs by Maria de los Santos and Davis Teague

Confession: I don’t read much middle grade.  OK, any.  Including Harry Potter.  (I know, I KNOW.)  But I’m a sucker for a good time travel story, and I loved the synopsis of Saving Lucas Biggs, a book that proved to be both moving and thought-provoking. Margaret comes from a long line of time travelers.  When the story begins, her father has been sentenced to a death by the crooked judge, Lucas Biggs, for a murder he didn’t commit.  Margaret lives in Victory,… Read more »


May 11
Review and Giveaway: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Review and Giveaway: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

If you’ve already read We Were Liars, you can appreciate how crazy this is is: I read the book yesterday, and earlier that day, I finished another book (which shall remain unnamed to prevent spoilers in either case) that had the SAME twist ending as We Were Liars.  Go ahead and digest that, because what are the chances?  Both stories were pretty good, but I think the other one pulled off the twist better.  Part of the problem, or perhaps,… Read more »


May 06
Review: After the End by Amy Plum

Review: After the End by Amy Plum

Writing thrillers and horror movies and books must have been a lot easier prior to the late 90’s/early 2000’s, before everyone over the age of ten had a cell phone.  Think of a film like The Blair Witch Project.  It would have been a much different (and much shorter) film if the characters had been able to whip out their phones to call for help or to open up their GPS. Phones play a big role in After the End,… Read more »