Source: Publisher


Nov 13
There Once Was a Book I Just Couldn’t Finish: A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty

There Once Was a Book I Just Couldn’t Finish: A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty

  Welcome to another  round of “Fun With Limericks,” a (hopefully) fun way of dealing with books I didn’t finish, or I finished, but for whatever reason, I felt I could not write a proper review.  So, I’ve done the most logical thing possible, and I’ve decided to write a limerick to express my thoughts on A Corner of White.  A Corner of White was a rare DNF for me.  I tried, I really did.  I read 50%, and while it wasn’t… Read more »


Nov 06
Review: Fault Line by Christa Desir

Review: Fault Line by Christa Desir

Fault Line is a little book (240 pages) about a big, awful subject: rape.  It unflinchingly shows the devastating effects of rape, both on the victim and the victim’s loved ones.  In this case, the story is complicated by the fact that Ani, the victim, was intoxicated at a party and loudly announced that she was going to have sex with several guys.  After heading upstairs with them, Ani wakes up the next morning with no memory of what happened…. Read more »


Nov 01
Review: Reality Boy by A.S. King

Review: Reality Boy by A.S. King

Reality TV makes a business out of exploiting people.  Sometimes, the people on these shows seem perfectly fine with it.  They’ll happily reveal their messed-up lives for the world to see in their desperate bid for fame.  For the most part, I feel no sympathy for these people.  I have very different feelings, however, for the children on these shows.  They can’t consent to the exploitation, but there are unfortunately parents out there who can and will.  The late Anna… Read more »


Oct 28
Review: After Eden by Helen Douglas

Review: After Eden by Helen Douglas

I enjoy stories about time travel, but one of my big challenges can be trying to wrap my mind around the science.  Often, an author’s explanation can be so complex that I eventually give up trying to figure out whether the author has covered all the bases involving the paradoxes of time travel.  In After Eden, Helen Douglas keeps the science simple and accessible, but there were some plot points that didn’t make sense.  For just one example that happened… Read more »


Oct 03
Review: Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb

Review: Witchstruck by Victoria Lamb

My knowledge of the Tudor period primarily comes from the Showtime series, The Tudors, the wonderful film, Elizabeth, starring Cate Blanchett, and the occasional historical fiction novel.  In other words, my knowledge is not exactly extensive, and I approached Witchstruck with the desire to be entertained and without any thought of wanting to nitpick for accuracy.  Obviously, since Lamb decided to feature a witch living alongside the future Queen Elizabeth, we know that this is not intended to be a… Read more »


Sep 27
Fun With Limericks: Inhuman by Kat Falls

Fun With Limericks: Inhuman by Kat Falls

This is my third round of “Fun With Limericks,” a (hopefully) fun way of dealing with books I didn’t finish, or I finished, but for whatever reason, I felt I could not write a proper review.  In the first go-round, I had a little fun with The S-Word by Chelsea Pitcher and A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty.  Next up was Gameboard of the Gods by Richelle Mead. Today, I bring you a limerick for Inhuman by Kat Falls.  I actually did finish… Read more »


Sep 19
Review: Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller

Review: Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller

Where the Stars Still Shine is set in Tarpon Springs, Florida, and after reading this book, I had to do a bit of research, because I wanted to visit this Gulf Coast town NOW.  Throughout the story, Doller made me feel like I was right there with Callie, viewing this town through her eyes. Callie had a childhood that was unconventional, at best.  Her mother kidnapped her at a young age from her father, and the two spent Callie’s childhood… Read more »


Sep 16
Review: Countdown by Michelle Rowen

Review: Countdown by Michelle Rowen

Kira and Rogan are strangers forcibly thrown into a deadly “game” called Countdown.  They must complete a series of tasks, each within a pre-determined time limit.  Complete the task and move on, or fail it and be killed.  Some of the tasks are puzzle-like, and others are designed to test their morality.  It sounds like an interesting premise, but everything fell apart quickly. Kira is informed that Rogan murdered and dismembered nine young women.  Any reader will know that this… Read more »